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Education commission releases its findings

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CNY/NNY/S. Tier: Education commission releases its findings
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Governor Cuomo's education reform commission has released its findings. The commission spent eight months holding public hearings and reviewing testimony about current programs in New York and across the country. Now, they want to see a more cohesive approach to education from preschool right up to college. Zack Fink has the details.

ALBANY, N.Y. -- New York State already spends more per pupil than any other state in the nation, but test scores don't reflect that.

"We failed our kids. It's been a disaster. You look at any measure from the national scores to our own Regents or college readiness scores," said Geoffrey Canada of the New New York Education Reform Commission.

The 25 member New New York Education Reform Commission was created last April. Its preliminary findings will be incorporated in the governor's State of the State address later this month.

Its first recommendation is to expand pre-kindergarten to a full day for the neediest school districts, something the governor is already saying may not be feasible.

"On the pre-k, I agree a hundred percent. You'll get every kind of report and study will back that up. Frankly it's going to be a question of money, because it's also very expensive," Governor Andrew Cuomo said.

"Am I dismayed? No. Nor am I surprised. Money is always an issue. And it's a question of priorities," said Dick Parsons, New New York Education Reform Commission Chairman.

Governor Cuomo was also asked about his efforts to call a special legislative session on gun control over the holiday. Cuomo said in years past, governors call lawmakers back even if there is no deal on legislation.

Cuomo said, "I will bring them back when we have an agreement. We don't have an agreement. I won't call them back unless we have an agreement."

Negotiations are ongoing. The governor is pushing for a strengthened assault weapon ban, but says microstamping of ammunition may be out of reach.


"I support microstamping,” Cuomo said. “I think it's highly unlikely we will get an agreement on it at this time."

The governor still has a week to call a special session before the new legislature convenes.

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